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Vehicle Safety Data Related to LUVs
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The difference in the energy in these vehicles is directly related to how much damage they can do. The energy relates to how quickly they can come to a stop. It translates to how much can be destroyed when they stop by hitting something.

The more energy in the vehicles the more energy it also takes to get them to that speed, which can translate into energy savings if they travel at slower speeds..

With these kinds of realities in play, how can it make sense to discourage slow light vehicles by requiring safety features created for vehicles that go over 70 mph? There is no technology known to man that can translate any of this into the larger vehicle being safer to the people in our communities.
About LUVs
A LUV in every garage
Local Use Vehicles

Speed of Vehicle

Distance to Stop Once Brake is Applied

17 mph

14 feet

35 mph

58 feet

70 mph

234 feet

(Does not including reaction time, just the time to actually stop a typical car under normal conditions.)

Most vehicles will come to a complete stop from 35 mph long before the 70 mph vehicle gets to half speed, as the following data would suggest:
The Wheego,
www.wheego.net,
Using US Technology installed in California
The safety technology in the fully compliant larger vehicles does not out weigh the sheer physics of the situation. The energy in a vehicle translates into the potential that vehicle has to hurt, maim and kill people both inside and outside the vehicle as well as to damage property. Here are some basic facts about the destructive energy of these vehicles:
Medium Speed (MSV)
Here are some calculations that show exactly how much energy is involved with each speed and different weights. A Force Index value is given that shows the force increase as a multiple of the base line given.

Comparison of Vehicle Destructive Potential

 

 

 

 

Speed

Weight

Kinetic

Destructive

 

 

Energy

Force

 (Mph)

 (Lbs)

 (Ft/Lbs)

Index

Gem LSV

 

 

 

25

1200

 25,063

 0.40

Passenger Vehicle

 

 Base line

25

3000

 62,658

 1.00

35

3000

 122,809

 1.96

45

3000

 203,012

 3.24

50

3000

 250,631

 4.00

70

3000

 491,238

 7.84

80

3000

 641,617

 10.24

 

 

 

 

Heavy Duty SUV - Escalade or comparable

25

5500

 114,873

 1.83

35

5500

 225,151

 3.59

45

5500

 372,188

 5.94

50

5500

 459,491

 7.33

70

5500

 900,602

 14.37

 

 

 

 

80

5500

 1,176,297

 18.77

 

Multiple from GEM

 46.93

The Vision
MSEV Need Support
Ten States have passed regulations to support MSEVs. Watch here for a link to learn more.
The following data was sourced from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation. The Data is from reports generated from the online safety and accident data system.

Automobile Fatalities by Category
Using a Three Year Average From 2005 to 2007

     A 5000lb vehicle has approx 1.7 times the energy of a 
3000lb vehicle at the same speed.

    A 5000lb vehicle speeding at 50 mph in a 35 mph zone has
approx 3.4 times the energy of a 3000lb vehicle limited to going 35 mph.

     A 5000lb vehicle going 80 mph has approx 8.7 times
the destructive energy of a 3000 lb vehicle limited to going 35 mph.

The raw data that supports the idea that speed kills come from two basic sources. One source is based on the basic physics of vehicle stopping and potential energy. This information is calculated using the Oregon State Police, Collision Reconstruction Program, Speed/Kinetic Energy/Stopping Distance/Time Saved Calculator and Graph.

The other source of information is from the records on vehicle safety and accidents as kept by the US Department Of Transportation. The records show that the physics play out with higher speed vehicles causing more accidents, death and injury.

The four topics covered on this page with data tables include:
The table below was extracted from the Traffic Safety Facts 2006 Data - Speeding
DOT HS 810 814 from Table 1. It is assumed that 2006 was fairly typical of recent results. Given that the three-year data for the Tables above had low levels of variation from one year to the other, this is a reasonable assumption.
Watch here for a link to the details of what NHTSA could handle more effectively.
wheegpwhip_white01s%20b.jpg
Stopping Distance
Vehicle Destructive Energy at Different Speeds
Vehicle Speed, Speed Zones and the Risk of Fatal Accidents
Speeding and the Risk of Fatal Accidents

Fatalities by Speed of Vehicle

 

 

 

1 to 5 MPH

          969

2.5%

6 to 15 MPH

      2,100

5.5%

16 to 25 MPH

       1,559

4.1%

26 to 35 MPH

       2,899

7.6%

 

      7,526

19.6%

 

 

 

36 to 45 MPH

       5,865

15.3%

46 to 55 MPH

      8,349

21.8%

56 to 65 MPH

       6,431

16.8%

66 to 75 MPH

       4,735

12.3%

76 to 85 MPH

       1,759

4.6%

86 to 96 MPH

          775

2.0%

97 MPH or Greater

          579

1.5%

Stopped Mot.Veh. In Tran.

      2,340

6.1%

 

      38,360

100.0%

 

 

 

Fatalities by Speed Limit

 

 

 

Up to 15 MPH

 79

0.2%

20 and 25 MPH

 1,790

4.7%

30 and 35 MPH

 6,189

16.1%

 

 8,058

21.0%

 

 

 

40 and 45 MPH

 8,156

21.2%

60 and 65 MPH

 5,247

13.7%

Over 70 mph

 2,641

6.9%

Total in Known Speed Zones

 32,160

83.8%

 

 

 

Blank

 4

 

No Statutory Limit

 114

 

Unknown

 1,011

 

Total

 38,383

 

Speeding-Related Traffic Fatalities by Road Type and Speed Limit, 2006

USA Total*

 

 

Fatalities

 

42,642

Total

 

13,543

Interstate

>55 mph

1,373

 

=55 mph

371

Non-Interstate

55 mph

3,410

 

50 mph

510

 

45 mph

1,873

 

40 mph

884

 

 

 

 

35 mph

1,593

 

<35 mph

1,492

Total Speeding Fatalities 35 mph zones and under

3,085

Total Fatalities 35 mph Zones and under 2006

8,217

Percent of Fatalities with Speeding as a Factor

37.5%

      Stopping Distance

      Vehicle Destructive Energy at Different Speeds

     Vehicle Speed, Speed Zones and the Risk of Fatal Accidents

      Speeding and the Risk of Fatal Accidents

MSVs are a key element in getting safe Local Use Vehicles on the road. There are blocks to realizing this LUV potential that need to be removed. Click here to learn more.
Safety Concerns for vehicles have created unintended consequence. Click here to learn more.
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